November 17, 2020
8 min read

7 Steps to Identify and Hire a Suitable Web/Software Engineer for Your Tech Team

Looking to add more developers to your tech team? Well, you should know that there are a lot of considerations when hiring a web or software engineer.

For instance, the size of your organisation and its precise needs will affect what you’re looking for. Your company’s recruitment budget will also affect what resources you can dedicate to finding it.

Then there’s the fact that it generally takes someone with actual web or software engineering skills to hire others with the very same skills! But given that many business owners or hiring managers don’t have tech skills, that can be a hurdle.

Basically, finding and hiring web or software engineers for your tech team can be more difficult than you’d think.

Fortunately for you, there are ways to take the horror out of it. You simply need to follow our guide to hiring web or software engineers here.

We’ll provide an overview of the 7-step process below. Then, we’ll give you further details on how to perform each step in subsequent articles.

1. How to Define a Web/Software Engineer Job Vacancy

The very first step is to identify your organisation’s requirements for the new hire.

Essentially, you have to come up with a description of the sort of person you need to hire. A good way to do that is to bring all parties with an interest in the filling of this position.

Ask them to describe the expectations or responsibilities of the position. Make sure that these are all aligned, from the ones provided by management to those offered by the tech team.

That’s a good way to ensure you know what you’re looking for as far as your entire organisation is concerned. It should also help you move on to the next step, which is to produce an actual job listing.

2. How to Attract Applicants

This is when you craft your job ad as well as get it out into the world. At this stage, you have several main concerns:

  • To ensure that your job ad is likely to attract precisely the right types of candidates and put off those who don’t fit your needs.
  • To ensure that your job ad is compelling enough to get attention amidst other similar postings.
  • To ensure that you can distribute the ad on the right channels to reach the candidates you want.

Your goal is to get all of those right. This part obviously requires a bit of marketing skill, so you may want to bring in your marketing team here to help with all three tasks above!

3. How to Conduct Initial Screening

Once you start getting responses to your job posting, it’s time to do some initial screening. This is meant to help you whittle down the pool of applicants to a more manageable level for deeper assessment.

A quick way to describe this is to call it the time when you look for deal-breakers. Are there red flags to look out for? Skills that you can’t do without?

Use these considerations to simplify your hiring process by getting rid of unqualified options early on. Doing quick and preliminary screening based on resumes or profiles can save you a lot of trouble later.

4. How to Assess for Technical Fit

Now you should have a smaller pool of candidates. You want to whittle away at this again to further reduce it: that’s actually pretty much the basic principle behind recruitment.

To do that, you have to assess each candidate’s technical or engineering skills to see if they’re capable of doing what you need them to do. There are several ways to do this.

First, you can ask them to perform coding challenges using resources like Coderbyte or CodeFights. Or even set up your own coding tasks for them to complete.

You can also ask them to walk you through certain projects they’ve done. Be sure to ask them to explain which part of development they think they did best and why, as well as what they would like to improve on and why.

You can also ask them a variety of tech interview questions, from problem-solving ones to assessments of others’ codes.

You may even want to test how up to date they are in their field by asking about tech trends and which ones they like most.

All of these demand some form of technical capability, of course. That means you will need someone familiar with web/software engineering to handle most of this stage.

5. How to Assess for Cultural Fit

Once you’ve narrowed down the list of options to those capable of performing the technical tasks expected of the position, it’s time to weed out those who can’t be relied on to contribute to the organisation or team.

This stage is when you take a look at the non-technical traits of applicants. These include traits like independence, leadership, collaborative skills, etc.

These can be just as important as technical skills. In certain situations, they may even be more important!

That’s because it’s possible for great engineers to learn new technical skills fairly easily, whereas it’s very difficult for people who lack a particular soft skill to acquire it quickly.

And these days, most organisations hire engineers for a team. Whether or not a person can fit into a team is therefore critical.

Even if they’re technically capable, if they can’t fit into and improve the team, they’re deadweight. So exclude them from consideration now!

6. How to Close the Deal and Sign Recruits

Assuming you’ve found the absolute best candidate for the position, both in terms of technical skill and cultural fit, it’s time to seal the deal. That means you now have to sign your chosen recruit.

This is also when you’ll have to do things like settle work arrangements or negotiate salaries. It’s possible to send the first draft of a contract to a prospective hire and have them send it back to you unsigned, for example… with requests for amendments.

The basic rule here is to work from a position of fairness and reason. Unless it will compromise your organisation or development in some way, consider the recruit’s requests.

As for the salary, the general practice is to consider both the standard of living in the recruit’s location and his or her actual skills and experience. The former requires a little more work (research, that is) if you’re hiring remotely, of course.

Either way, bear in mind that you may have to exercise a little flexibility here. Just how much flexibility you can afford will naturally depend on your specific situation.

7. How to Onboard New Team Members

So they’ve signed the contract. Congratulations! The last step is to onboard your new team member, i.e. get your new hire settled in.

That means making them comfortable, ensuring they know what’s expected of them and where to start, and introducing them to the rest of the organisation or tech team.

Broadly speaking, that boils down to doing the following things:

  • Preparing their workplace and/or the tools (equipment, tech stack, etc.) that they will need for their job.
  • Informing the rest of the organisation of their recruitment, the date they start working, their precise position within the organisation or hierarchy, and their responsibilities.
  • Assigning their first tasks to them in advance so they know what to work on when they begin.
  • Introducing them to the rest of the company, particularly their managers, team leaders, and the rest of the tech team.

If you’re hiring remotely, say due to COVID-19, note that you still have to perform these tasks. The way you perform them will just change: mostly through communication channels like group chat, video conferencing, etc.

Still Need Help Recruiting a Web/Software Engineer?

Now if you still need help recruiting the new member of your tech team, that’s all right. As we said earlier, this is just the overview for our How to Hire a Web/Software Engineer series.

We’ll provide you more concrete advice and details on how to go about each of the 7 steps above in later articles. That should help you get a better handle on the recruitment process.

But if you can’t wait, you can also just get in touch with us this very moment. At Skilledd, we specialise in recruitment of web and software engineers for businesses.

We can give you advice and help you find the talent you need. Contact us at Skilledd now!

Looking to add more developers to your tech team? Well, you should know that there are a lot of considerations when hiring a web or software engineer.

For instance, the size of your organisation and its precise needs will affect what you’re looking for. Your company’s recruitment budget will also affect what resources you can dedicate to finding it.

Then there’s the fact that it generally takes someone with actual web or software engineering skills to hire others with the very same skills! But given that many business owners or hiring managers don’t have tech skills, that can be a hurdle.

Basically, finding and hiring web or software engineers for your tech team can be more difficult than you’d think.

Fortunately for you, there are ways to take the horror out of it. You simply need to follow our guide to hiring web or software engineers here.

We’ll provide an overview of the 7-step process below. Then, we’ll give you further details on how to perform each step in subsequent articles.

1. How to Define a Web/Software Engineer Job Vacancy

The very first step is to identify your organisation’s requirements for the new hire.

Essentially, you have to come up with a description of the sort of person you need to hire. A good way to do that is to bring all parties with an interest in the filling of this position.

Ask them to describe the expectations or responsibilities of the position. Make sure that these are all aligned, from the ones provided by management to those offered by the tech team.

That’s a good way to ensure you know what you’re looking for as far as your entire organisation is concerned. It should also help you move on to the next step, which is to produce an actual job listing.

2. How to Attract Applicants

This is when you craft your job ad as well as get it out into the world. At this stage, you have several main concerns:

  • To ensure that your job ad is likely to attract precisely the right types of candidates and put off those who don’t fit your needs.
  • To ensure that your job ad is compelling enough to get attention amidst other similar postings.
  • To ensure that you can distribute the ad on the right channels to reach the candidates you want.

Your goal is to get all of those right. This part obviously requires a bit of marketing skill, so you may want to bring in your marketing team here to help with all three tasks above!

3. How to Conduct Initial Screening

Once you start getting responses to your job posting, it’s time to do some initial screening. This is meant to help you whittle down the pool of applicants to a more manageable level for deeper assessment.

A quick way to describe this is to call it the time when you look for deal-breakers. Are there red flags to look out for? Skills that you can’t do without?

Use these considerations to simplify your hiring process by getting rid of unqualified options early on. Doing quick and preliminary screening based on resumes or profiles can save you a lot of trouble later.

4. How to Assess for Technical Fit

Now you should have a smaller pool of candidates. You want to whittle away at this again to further reduce it: that’s actually pretty much the basic principle behind recruitment.

To do that, you have to assess each candidate’s technical or engineering skills to see if they’re capable of doing what you need them to do. There are several ways to do this.

First, you can ask them to perform coding challenges using resources like Coderbyte or CodeFights. Or even set up your own coding tasks for them to complete.

You can also ask them to walk you through certain projects they’ve done. Be sure to ask them to explain which part of development they think they did best and why, as well as what they would like to improve on and why.

You can also ask them a variety of tech interview questions, from problem-solving ones to assessments of others’ codes.

You may even want to test how up to date they are in their field by asking about tech trends and which ones they like most.

All of these demand some form of technical capability, of course. That means you will need someone familiar with web/software engineering to handle most of this stage.

5. How to Assess for Cultural Fit

Once you’ve narrowed down the list of options to those capable of performing the technical tasks expected of the position, it’s time to weed out those who can’t be relied on to contribute to the organisation or team.

This stage is when you take a look at the non-technical traits of applicants. These include traits like independence, leadership, collaborative skills, etc.

These can be just as important as technical skills. In certain situations, they may even be more important!

That’s because it’s possible for great engineers to learn new technical skills fairly easily, whereas it’s very difficult for people who lack a particular soft skill to acquire it quickly.

And these days, most organisations hire engineers for a team. Whether or not a person can fit into a team is therefore critical.

Even if they’re technically capable, if they can’t fit into and improve the team, they’re deadweight. So exclude them from consideration now!

6. How to Close the Deal and Sign Recruits

Assuming you’ve found the absolute best candidate for the position, both in terms of technical skill and cultural fit, it’s time to seal the deal. That means you now have to sign your chosen recruit.

This is also when you’ll have to do things like settle work arrangements or negotiate salaries. It’s possible to send the first draft of a contract to a prospective hire and have them send it back to you unsigned, for example… with requests for amendments.

The basic rule here is to work from a position of fairness and reason. Unless it will compromise your organisation or development in some way, consider the recruit’s requests.

As for the salary, the general practice is to consider both the standard of living in the recruit’s location and his or her actual skills and experience. The former requires a little more work (research, that is) if you’re hiring remotely, of course.

Either way, bear in mind that you may have to exercise a little flexibility here. Just how much flexibility you can afford will naturally depend on your specific situation.

7. How to Onboard New Team Members

So they’ve signed the contract. Congratulations! The last step is to onboard your new team member, i.e. get your new hire settled in.

That means making them comfortable, ensuring they know what’s expected of them and where to start, and introducing them to the rest of the organisation or tech team.

Broadly speaking, that boils down to doing the following things:

  • Preparing their workplace and/or the tools (equipment, tech stack, etc.) that they will need for their job.
  • Informing the rest of the organisation of their recruitment, the date they start working, their precise position within the organisation or hierarchy, and their responsibilities.
  • Assigning their first tasks to them in advance so they know what to work on when they begin.
  • Introducing them to the rest of the company, particularly their managers, team leaders, and the rest of the tech team.

If you’re hiring remotely, say due to COVID-19, note that you still have to perform these tasks. The way you perform them will just change: mostly through communication channels like group chat, video conferencing, etc.

Still Need Help Recruiting a Web/Software Engineer?

Now if you still need help recruiting the new member of your tech team, that’s all right. As we said earlier, this is just the overview for our How to Hire a Web/Software Engineer series.

We’ll provide you more concrete advice and details on how to go about each of the 7 steps above in later articles. That should help you get a better handle on the recruitment process.

But if you can’t wait, you can also just get in touch with us this very moment. At Skilledd, we specialise in recruitment of web and software engineers for businesses.

We can give you advice and help you find the talent you need. Contact us at Skilledd now!

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