December 11, 2020
5 min read

Step 6: How to Close the Deal and Sign Recruits

If you’ve been following our guide to how to hire web/software engineers, you should have winnowed down your list of candidates to only the “hireable” ones by now.

That means it’s time to start signing the one or ones you believe to be right for the job.

Ironically enough, this may be one of the hardest parts of hiring web or software engineers. You see, good software engineers are a hot commodity. Great ones are even more in demand.

So, don’t be astonished if you get to this point only to learn that your top choice is already fielding more than one offer from other employers!

Still, there are things you can do to tip the odds in your favour, from offering attractive work arrangements to negotiating salaries and benefits. We’ll go over them below.

ABC - Always Be Closing

This is actually a bit of advice you’ll hear from most recruitment managers. That’s because it works so well!

The idea is to conduct your entire process such that you are working on closing the deal at every stage.

That means you should have been trying to close the deal with recruits from Stage 1 of the process, not just now.

Doing this makes it easier for you to persuade them to take the final step and sign the contract. It will be much harder for you to win them over if you start only now.

Develop an Employer Brand

An employer brand refers to the reputation you have among employees and would-be recruits. It’s what you’re known for as an employer, in other words.

Are you known for strong workplace diversity? For a warm company culture? Perhaps even for your work-from-home policies?

All of these can become part of your employer brand… and they can be powerful arguments for someone to sign up as part of your team.

Take note that while salaries and benefits may belong here too, they are not the ultimate determinants of your employer brand’s strength.

Many web/software engineers freely admit that they consider things like flexible hours more important than high salaries, for instance.

You may even want to think outside the box here. It can help you truly set yourself apart from the crowd as an employer.

For instance, since so many employees now recognise the value of mental and emotional health, why not try to provide for it? Offer perks or initiatives that can help employees maintain better mental and emotional health as part of the package.

Ask, Confirm, and Negotiate

Most hiring processes will involve you dealing with candidates more than once. Ours certainly requires that, as you should have seen in the steps before this one.

It can be useful to use all of these moments of interaction to ask, confirm, or even negotiate with a view to closing the deal.

Use questions to find out what they want, whether or not there’s a chance you can sign them, and if they have other prospective employers.

Here are some examples of queries you can use:

  • Are they interviewing with other companies, and how many?
  • Do they have precise needs or wants in the types of companies they’re looking at?
  • Have they been sent offers yet? 
  • What’s their deadline for choosing an offer?

You can also start telling them -- basically, confirming to them -- what they can expect from you as an employer. You can answer questions about salary, work arrangements, and more.

Depending on various circumstances, you may even be able to negotiate with candidates at this point.

For example, if the candidate expresses concerns about the working arrangements, you may be able to offer them an alternative setup. Or you could offer them different work hours.

Some even negotiate salaries at this stage, but the general rule is not to undercut your talent, because it’s not worth it. It doesn’t improve your employer brand and it won’t endear you to anyone either.

If you make recruits a fair offer from the outset, you probably won’t have to negotiate over salaries at all… or simply won’t have the ability to do so.

This doesn’t mean you can’t compete with bigger, higher-paying employers for one engineer, though. Again, as we said before, you can boost your appeal by offering other types of perks, like flexible hours.

Tie Offers to Their Career Goals

Finally, try to link the job offer to the future they want for themselves. If you’ve paid proper attention to a candidate’s application and interview, you should now know what their career goals are.

You know what motivations they have, career-wise. You know what they need to consider a job valuable as well as meaningful.

Tie that into what you offer as an employer. If they believe in improving the world, show precisely how you’re improving the world.

Sell the company to them and they’ll be more likely to join it. They’ll feel that it aligns with their visions of their future, or their values in their work.

Several of the steps before this one should make this easier, by the way. For instance, Step 2 of this guide should have helped you craft a job ad able to attract those whose values align with your organisation’s.

In the same way, Step 5 should have helped you weed out those who don’t fit into your company’s culture.

That’s why it’s so important for your recruitment process to be cohesive. This isn’t the easiest thing to pull off sometimes, though, especially for new employers.

Again, if you’re not sure how to implement these steps yourself, reach out to us for help. Skilledd has successfully recruited hundreds of top web/software engineers for companies of all sizes.

We’ll be happy to give you all the assistance you need. Otherwise, feel free to go on to the next and final step of our guide: onboarding the new recruits.

If you’ve been following our guide to how to hire web/software engineers, you should have winnowed down your list of candidates to only the “hireable” ones by now.

That means it’s time to start signing the one or ones you believe to be right for the job.

Ironically enough, this may be one of the hardest parts of hiring web or software engineers. You see, good software engineers are a hot commodity. Great ones are even more in demand.

So, don’t be astonished if you get to this point only to learn that your top choice is already fielding more than one offer from other employers!

Still, there are things you can do to tip the odds in your favour, from offering attractive work arrangements to negotiating salaries and benefits. We’ll go over them below.

ABC - Always Be Closing

This is actually a bit of advice you’ll hear from most recruitment managers. That’s because it works so well!

The idea is to conduct your entire process such that you are working on closing the deal at every stage.

That means you should have been trying to close the deal with recruits from Stage 1 of the process, not just now.

Doing this makes it easier for you to persuade them to take the final step and sign the contract. It will be much harder for you to win them over if you start only now.

Develop an Employer Brand

An employer brand refers to the reputation you have among employees and would-be recruits. It’s what you’re known for as an employer, in other words.

Are you known for strong workplace diversity? For a warm company culture? Perhaps even for your work-from-home policies?

All of these can become part of your employer brand… and they can be powerful arguments for someone to sign up as part of your team.

Take note that while salaries and benefits may belong here too, they are not the ultimate determinants of your employer brand’s strength.

Many web/software engineers freely admit that they consider things like flexible hours more important than high salaries, for instance.

You may even want to think outside the box here. It can help you truly set yourself apart from the crowd as an employer.

For instance, since so many employees now recognise the value of mental and emotional health, why not try to provide for it? Offer perks or initiatives that can help employees maintain better mental and emotional health as part of the package.

Ask, Confirm, and Negotiate

Most hiring processes will involve you dealing with candidates more than once. Ours certainly requires that, as you should have seen in the steps before this one.

It can be useful to use all of these moments of interaction to ask, confirm, or even negotiate with a view to closing the deal.

Use questions to find out what they want, whether or not there’s a chance you can sign them, and if they have other prospective employers.

Here are some examples of queries you can use:

  • Are they interviewing with other companies, and how many?
  • Do they have precise needs or wants in the types of companies they’re looking at?
  • Have they been sent offers yet? 
  • What’s their deadline for choosing an offer?

You can also start telling them -- basically, confirming to them -- what they can expect from you as an employer. You can answer questions about salary, work arrangements, and more.

Depending on various circumstances, you may even be able to negotiate with candidates at this point.

For example, if the candidate expresses concerns about the working arrangements, you may be able to offer them an alternative setup. Or you could offer them different work hours.

Some even negotiate salaries at this stage, but the general rule is not to undercut your talent, because it’s not worth it. It doesn’t improve your employer brand and it won’t endear you to anyone either.

If you make recruits a fair offer from the outset, you probably won’t have to negotiate over salaries at all… or simply won’t have the ability to do so.

This doesn’t mean you can’t compete with bigger, higher-paying employers for one engineer, though. Again, as we said before, you can boost your appeal by offering other types of perks, like flexible hours.

Tie Offers to Their Career Goals

Finally, try to link the job offer to the future they want for themselves. If you’ve paid proper attention to a candidate’s application and interview, you should now know what their career goals are.

You know what motivations they have, career-wise. You know what they need to consider a job valuable as well as meaningful.

Tie that into what you offer as an employer. If they believe in improving the world, show precisely how you’re improving the world.

Sell the company to them and they’ll be more likely to join it. They’ll feel that it aligns with their visions of their future, or their values in their work.

Several of the steps before this one should make this easier, by the way. For instance, Step 2 of this guide should have helped you craft a job ad able to attract those whose values align with your organisation’s.

In the same way, Step 5 should have helped you weed out those who don’t fit into your company’s culture.

That’s why it’s so important for your recruitment process to be cohesive. This isn’t the easiest thing to pull off sometimes, though, especially for new employers.

Again, if you’re not sure how to implement these steps yourself, reach out to us for help. Skilledd has successfully recruited hundreds of top web/software engineers for companies of all sizes.

We’ll be happy to give you all the assistance you need. Otherwise, feel free to go on to the next and final step of our guide: onboarding the new recruits.

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