December 14, 2020
6 min read

Step 7: How to Onboard New Web/Software Engineers

If you’ve made it through all the steps in our guide to recruiting web/software engineers, all that’s left for you now is to onboard your new hires.

Essentially, that means ensuring they get settled in and integrated into the company properly. That covers a lot of tasks, from preparing their workplace and to pre-empting their teammates for their arrival.

Specifics will vary, of course, and may also be affected by the contract you settle on with the applicant in Step 6, where you negotiated work arrangements.

For instance, you may have agreed to hire your new web/software engineer for a telecommuting position instead of an in-office one.

Because of that, we’ll make allowances for that here. Below, we’ll note any special considerations to be taken when onboarding team members who will be remote workers.

However, note that as much as possible, you should onboard remote developers as if they were actually on-site. Most of the onboarding steps below can be done digitally, after all, thanks to remote collaboration and communication apps.

Introduce Them to the Tools They Need

This is actually something best done even during the recruitment interviews. That’s because it may be in your interest to use familiarity with your preferred tools as a nice-to-have during the candidate qualification process.

Anyway, it would be ideal to give new hires a list of all the tools they need right after they sign up. There are several reasons for that.

If you’re hiring remote employees, it’s because they need to set up their own workstations and thus have to download and install those tools themselves.

But even if they’re in-office employees who’ll find those tools in the workstations you provide for them, they may want to install the same tools on their home computers. That way, they can start learning to use those tools ASAP.

It would be doubly helpful if you prepared manuals for these tools as well and distributed them to new hires. This can supplement whatever formal training sessions you offer new engineers in this area.

Review Projects and Duties

Again, you should have covered these in the interview phase, to be sure. Still, it doesn’t hurt to review these during the actual onboarding!

That means reminding them of things like these:

  • The project’s goals, both in the long run and the short run
  • What problems the project currently faces
  • What tasks they have to handle for the project
  • What the priorities are for tasks

You may even want to put together an internal wiki just for the project or team to which you’re assigning recruits. That way, they have something to which they can refer easily whenever they want to confirm something on these matters.

Provide Resources for Corporate Culture

You have to confirm the corporate culture and system that they signed up for. It’s a good way to ensure they know the basic rules of dealing with coworkers, working for your brand, and the like.

One way to do it is to make an employee handbook. It should cover all the essential rules of working for your company, as well as the company’s values.

You can also provide another internal wiki that outlines core processes, such as how to report issues with the project or even how to communicate with coworkers.

Finally, you can assign a mentor who can help the new hire settle into this new system. This is a very effective way of making new hires feel socially accepted in the workplace too, thanks to the regular interaction between them and their mentors.

Don’t assume that mentors always have to be your senior workers, by the way. Assigning mentoring duties to them all the time can lead to resentment, especially if they already have a lot of other tasks.

Try assigning junior engineers mentorship roles too, to help them grow and prove their worth as potential leaders.

Introduce Them to Their Coworkers

Obviously, you have to do this as part of onboarding. Start with their team leader, or whomever they’re supposed to report to directly as part of the job.

The best practice would actually be to involve this person in the recruitment process, so they would likely have already met them in an interview.

Anyway, even if they have met before, let them get reacquainted now. After that, introduce them to the rest of the team.

Obviously, all of this can be done remotely too for telecommuting engineers. Our suggestion is to involve key employees in the first video introduction.

If you have an office, take new hires on a video tour of it too. It can help them feel more like they’re truly part of the company now.

Go Over the Working Setup Checklist

Now they more or less know what they’re going to do, whom they’re working with, and so on. It’s time to actually work them into your process.

Among other things, that means ensuring they have access to the following:

  • Internal and external services, like your IT support, your Slack chats, etc.
  • To edit the tasks in the project management system 
  • Your team’s meeting schedule

Ensuring they can access those will help them ease into the actual work, so it’s vital to have a checklist for this and go through it.


Provide Technical Documentation

Without documentation, engineers will be hard-pressed to start working on a project.

This is especially important for remote web/software engineers who may not be able to question colleagues as quickly as in-office ones on certain project points.

That means giving them access to the GIT-repository for the project, for instance, so they can see the source code. It may also mean sharing the setup manual for your database.

You may also need to share things like the test environment, API keys and credentials for the project’s tools, or even dependencies and their version numbers.

Sample data could be useful too, along with input manuals. Finally, there are things like deployment credentials for staging and deployment notes.

All of these give them a base from which to start and information to guide their work.

Concluding Onboarding & Recruitment

As a final note on both onboarding and hiring, we strongly recommend creating a standardised process for all of the stages of recruitment.

While you can certainly adapt the tips in our guide to suit your organisation and needs, standardising your adaptation will spare you a lot of time and effort later on.

If it’s standardised, it’s also documented… which means it’s easier to assess and review based on feedback.

Some companies now have both new employees and mentors give feedback on the onboarding process, for instance. That lets management improve that process continuously.

The same goes for the rest of the hiring process.

Just bear in mind, it takes time to get a truly effective one set up, however. Organisations often have to go through a lot of trial and error during which great recruits may fall through the gaps.

If you want to skip that, though, you can call us. Skilledd specialises in recruitment of amazing tech talent throughout Southeast Asia: we’ve already honed our process to precision.

Just send us a message or call us now and we’ll help you out with your search for new web/software engineers!

If you’ve made it through all the steps in our guide to recruiting web/software engineers, all that’s left for you now is to onboard your new hires.

Essentially, that means ensuring they get settled in and integrated into the company properly. That covers a lot of tasks, from preparing their workplace and to pre-empting their teammates for their arrival.

Specifics will vary, of course, and may also be affected by the contract you settle on with the applicant in Step 6, where you negotiated work arrangements.

For instance, you may have agreed to hire your new web/software engineer for a telecommuting position instead of an in-office one.

Because of that, we’ll make allowances for that here. Below, we’ll note any special considerations to be taken when onboarding team members who will be remote workers.

However, note that as much as possible, you should onboard remote developers as if they were actually on-site. Most of the onboarding steps below can be done digitally, after all, thanks to remote collaboration and communication apps.

Introduce Them to the Tools They Need

This is actually something best done even during the recruitment interviews. That’s because it may be in your interest to use familiarity with your preferred tools as a nice-to-have during the candidate qualification process.

Anyway, it would be ideal to give new hires a list of all the tools they need right after they sign up. There are several reasons for that.

If you’re hiring remote employees, it’s because they need to set up their own workstations and thus have to download and install those tools themselves.

But even if they’re in-office employees who’ll find those tools in the workstations you provide for them, they may want to install the same tools on their home computers. That way, they can start learning to use those tools ASAP.

It would be doubly helpful if you prepared manuals for these tools as well and distributed them to new hires. This can supplement whatever formal training sessions you offer new engineers in this area.

Review Projects and Duties

Again, you should have covered these in the interview phase, to be sure. Still, it doesn’t hurt to review these during the actual onboarding!

That means reminding them of things like these:

  • The project’s goals, both in the long run and the short run
  • What problems the project currently faces
  • What tasks they have to handle for the project
  • What the priorities are for tasks

You may even want to put together an internal wiki just for the project or team to which you’re assigning recruits. That way, they have something to which they can refer easily whenever they want to confirm something on these matters.

Provide Resources for Corporate Culture

You have to confirm the corporate culture and system that they signed up for. It’s a good way to ensure they know the basic rules of dealing with coworkers, working for your brand, and the like.

One way to do it is to make an employee handbook. It should cover all the essential rules of working for your company, as well as the company’s values.

You can also provide another internal wiki that outlines core processes, such as how to report issues with the project or even how to communicate with coworkers.

Finally, you can assign a mentor who can help the new hire settle into this new system. This is a very effective way of making new hires feel socially accepted in the workplace too, thanks to the regular interaction between them and their mentors.

Don’t assume that mentors always have to be your senior workers, by the way. Assigning mentoring duties to them all the time can lead to resentment, especially if they already have a lot of other tasks.

Try assigning junior engineers mentorship roles too, to help them grow and prove their worth as potential leaders.

Introduce Them to Their Coworkers

Obviously, you have to do this as part of onboarding. Start with their team leader, or whomever they’re supposed to report to directly as part of the job.

The best practice would actually be to involve this person in the recruitment process, so they would likely have already met them in an interview.

Anyway, even if they have met before, let them get reacquainted now. After that, introduce them to the rest of the team.

Obviously, all of this can be done remotely too for telecommuting engineers. Our suggestion is to involve key employees in the first video introduction.

If you have an office, take new hires on a video tour of it too. It can help them feel more like they’re truly part of the company now.

Go Over the Working Setup Checklist

Now they more or less know what they’re going to do, whom they’re working with, and so on. It’s time to actually work them into your process.

Among other things, that means ensuring they have access to the following:

  • Internal and external services, like your IT support, your Slack chats, etc.
  • To edit the tasks in the project management system 
  • Your team’s meeting schedule

Ensuring they can access those will help them ease into the actual work, so it’s vital to have a checklist for this and go through it.


Provide Technical Documentation

Without documentation, engineers will be hard-pressed to start working on a project.

This is especially important for remote web/software engineers who may not be able to question colleagues as quickly as in-office ones on certain project points.

That means giving them access to the GIT-repository for the project, for instance, so they can see the source code. It may also mean sharing the setup manual for your database.

You may also need to share things like the test environment, API keys and credentials for the project’s tools, or even dependencies and their version numbers.

Sample data could be useful too, along with input manuals. Finally, there are things like deployment credentials for staging and deployment notes.

All of these give them a base from which to start and information to guide their work.

Concluding Onboarding & Recruitment

As a final note on both onboarding and hiring, we strongly recommend creating a standardised process for all of the stages of recruitment.

While you can certainly adapt the tips in our guide to suit your organisation and needs, standardising your adaptation will spare you a lot of time and effort later on.

If it’s standardised, it’s also documented… which means it’s easier to assess and review based on feedback.

Some companies now have both new employees and mentors give feedback on the onboarding process, for instance. That lets management improve that process continuously.

The same goes for the rest of the hiring process.

Just bear in mind, it takes time to get a truly effective one set up, however. Organisations often have to go through a lot of trial and error during which great recruits may fall through the gaps.

If you want to skip that, though, you can call us. Skilledd specialises in recruitment of amazing tech talent throughout Southeast Asia: we’ve already honed our process to precision.

Just send us a message or call us now and we’ll help you out with your search for new web/software engineers!

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